JooMix

Air conditioning (often referred to as AC, A.C., or A/C) is the process of removing heat from a confined space, thus cooling the air, and removing humidity. Air conditioning can be used in both domestic and commercial environments. This process is used to achieve a more comfortable interior environment, typically for humans or animals; however, air conditioning is also used to cool/dehumidify rooms filled with heat-producing electronic devices, such as computer servers, power amplifiers, and even to display and store artwork.

A mini-split system typically supplies air conditioned and heated air to a single or a few rooms of a building.[33] Mutli-zone systems are a common application of ductless systems and allow up to 8 rooms (zones) to be conditioned from a single outdoor unit. Multi-zone systems typically offer a variety of indoor unit styles including wall-mounted, ceiling-mounted, ceiling recessed, and horizontal ducted. Mini-split systems typically produce 9,000 to 36,000 Btu (9,500–38,000 kJ) per hour of cooling. Multi-zone systems provide extended cooling and heating capacity up to 60,000 Btu's.

A portable air conditioner can be easily transported inside a home or office. They are currently available with capacities of about 5,000–60,000 BTU/h (1,500–18,000 W) and with or without electric-resistance heaters. Portable air conditioners are either evaporative or refrigerative.

Heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) is the technology of indoor and vehicular environmental comfort. Its goal is to provide thermal comfort and acceptable indoor air quality. HVAC system design is a subdiscipline of mechanical engineering, based on the principles of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer. Refrigeration is sometimes added to the field's abbreviation as HVAC&R or HVACR, or ventilating is dropped as in HACR (such as the designation of HACR-rated circuit breakers).

A zoning system for your HVAC system is a way to control the temperature for each area, or “zone” in your home, rather than have to heat or cool the whole house to the same temperature. With a zoning system, you can set temperatures differently for either individual rooms or sections of your home.

Typically, with forced air systems there is only one thermostat to control the heating and cooling for the entire home. Once that thermostat calls for heating or cooling there is virtually no way to control the temperature in each room of the house except by manually closing off the outlets in each room. This manual method is time-consuming and can cause harm to the HVAC unit, as closing off too many outlets can reduce the airflow. This could shorten the life of the furnace, air conditioner or heat pump.

Zoning solves this problem. It also allows you to save energy (and therefore money) by not heating or cooling rooms when they don’t need it. If, for example, you live in a two-story home and don’t use the upstairs very much, you can set the thermostat upstairs so that it doesn’t call for heat or cool air very often.

A zoning system is a professionally installed control system consisting of a damper and thermostat for each room or zone of the house. This control system is wired into a central control panel that sequences each thermostat’s call with the zone dampers in the ducts and the HVAC system.

HOW DOES ZONING WORK?

Zoning is a simple product and concept. Zoning provides the ability to only condition those rooms that need heating or cooling and does not allow conditioned air into those zones not requiring it. Zoning does this through a series of components, the first being motorized dampers that open and close based on the demands of the zone thermostats. These dampers insert into the ducts or can be installed at the air outlet for each room or zone. Multiple dampers can be controlled together for a single zone if multiple ducts serve a single room or zone.

The next key components are the zone thermostats. In existing homes, the existing thermostat can be used as a zone thermostat. As each zone is divided, each zone uses a thermostat to control the heating, cooling and fan operation for its individual zone. The zone thermostats and dampers are wired into a central control panel. The panel then also connects to the thermostat connections on the HVAC Unit. Instead of using one central thermostat, the control panel allows the unit to be controlled by multiple thermostats.

As each thermostat calls for heating or cooling, the panel takes the first call from any zone. If it’s heating, for example, it will keep open the damper to the calling zone, close the dampers to satisfied zones not calling for heating, activate the furnace or heat pump and begin supplying air only to that zone. If during this call other zones call for heating, those zone dampers would open and heated air would be supplied to those zones as well. Once all heating calls are satisfied the panel will shut off the furnace or heat pump.

To understand why zoning makes sense, think of it like having a light switch in every room of the house. You wouldn’t install just one light switch to turn on and off all of the lights in the house, would you? The same is true for heating and cooling. One thermostat turning on the heating or cooling for the entire house, when you only need it in one room or zone, wastes energy.

Our goal is to help educate our customers about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about how HVAC zone systems work and other HVAC topics, download our free Home Comfort Resource guide.

Jon Wayne Heating and Air Conditioning services San Antonio and the surrounding communities of Seguin, New Braunfels, Bulverde, Boerne, and Comal County. To get started, check out our website or see our current promotions.

 

We use cookies to improve our website. By continuing to use this website, you are giving consent to cookies being used. More details…